What are the Current Income Tax Brackets for the United States?

Income tax in the US is calculated by applying one or more tax rates to your taxable income.  The US currently has six tax brackets which came into force through the Tax Relief Act of 2010.  For the years 2011 and 2012, the same tax brackets that applied in 2010 have been extended.  But what are the tax brackets?

If you want an answer to the question ‘what are the Current Income Tax Brackets for the United States?’ you’ve come to the right place.  Keep reading for the answer.

The tax brackets system

For 2011 and 2012 there will be six tax brackets.  These are:

  • 10%,
  • 15%,
  • 25%,
  • 28%,
  • 33%, and
  • 35%.
  • Unless new legislation is passed, the tax brackets will change in 2013.  The 10% rate will collapse into the 15% rate; the 25% rate will become 28%, the 28% rate will become 31%, the 33% rate will become 36%, and the 35% rate will become 39.6%.

    2011 tax brackets

    The tax brackets for 2011 depend on your filing status as follows:

    Tax rate Single Head of Household Married Filing Jointly or Surviving Spouse Married Filing Separately
    10% Up to $8,500 Up to $12,150 Up to $17,000 Up to $8,500
    15% $8,501 to $34,500 $12,151 to $46,250 $17,001 to $69,000 $8,501 to $34,500
    25% $34,501 to $83,600 $46,251 to $119,400 $69,001 to $139,350 $34,501 to $69,675
    28% $83,601 to $174,400 $119,401 to $193,350 $139,351 to $212,300 $69,676 to $106,150
    33% $174,401 to $379,150 $193,351 to $379,150 $212,301 to $379,150 $106,151 to $189,575 
    35% $379,151 or more $379,151 or more $379,151 or more $189,576 or more

    2012 tax brackets

    The tax brackets generally change every year.  While the tax rates may not always change, the amount of your taxable income that is charged at different tax rates roulette generally does change.  The tax brackets for 2012 are:

    Tax rate Single Head of Household Married Filing Jointly or Surviving Spouse Married Filing Separately
    10% Up to $8,700 Up to $12,400 Up to $17,400 Up to $8,700
    15% $8,701 to $35,350 $12,401 to $47,350 $17,401 to $70,700 $8,701 to $35,350
    25% $35,351 to $85,650 $47,351 to $122,300 $70,701 to $142,700 $35,351 to $71.350
    28% $85,651 to $178,650 $122,301 to $198,050 $142,701 to $217,450 $71,351 to $108,725
    33% $178,651 to $388,350 $198,051 to $388,350 $217,451 to $388,350 $108,726 to $194,175 
    35% $388,351 or more $388,351 or more $388,351 or more $194,176 or more

    Taxable income

    It’s important to remember that not all of your income is taxed.  Your taxable income is calculated as your gross income less any allowable tax deductions.

    If you’re a citizen and individual who has U.S. tax residency, you may deduct a flat amount as a standard deduction.  Alternatively, you may claim an itemized deduction for actual amounts incurred for specific categories of non-business expenses.

    For example, home owners may deduct the amount of interest and property taxes paid on their principal and second homes while local and state income taxes are also deductible.

    2 Comments + Add Comment

    Leave a comment